Into another history of european Cinema
SPANISH PREMIERE

GUARD! ALERT!

Jean Grémillon, Luis Buñuel | Spain | 1937 | 80 min.
O.V. in Spanish
centinela, alerta

Luis Buñuel worked as executive producer (and more) for the production company Filmófono, which during the years of the Republic decided to adapt Carlos Arniches' zarzuela La alegría del batallón with the major recruit Jean Gremillon as director. This resulted in ¡Centinela, alerta! (one of the few films of that period that did not "disappear" during the dictatorship), in which Buñuel assisted Gremillon, directing several sequences. Although neither one of them signed the film, the hand of the two masters can be felt behind the story of the young Candelas, seduced, pregnant and abandoned, and then helped by two soldiers, a film that was restored today thanks to the efforts of the Centro Buñuel Calanda with the support of the ICAA, using materials from the Spanish Film Archive and the Zaragoza Film Archive.

Direction: Jean Grémillon, Luis Buñuel
Script: Luis Buñuel, Eduardo Ugarte
Cinematography: José María Beltrán
Música Music: Daniel Montorio, Fernando Remacha
Cast: Ángel Sampedro 'Angelillo', Ana María Custodio, Luis Heredia, José María Linares-Rivas, Pablo Álvarez Rubio
Production Company: Filmófono S.A

INTO ANOTHER HISTORY OF EUROPEAN CINEMA

History, we know, is neither neutral nor incontestable: depending on who tells it and how. When it comes to the history of European cinema, it is increasingly necessary to re-evaluate the dominant canon that guides it, bringing to the forefront works both remarkable and often undervalued. For this reason, a new space has been launched to offer a new way of contemplating the continent's film legacy each year, entitled "Into Another History of European Cinema". The section is set up as a forum for reflection and (re)discovery, paying significant attention to pioneering works of feminism, class consciousness and the new types of cinema that have shaken the world since the sixties (some of them censored or attacked by the establishment), as well as to little-known works by key filmmakers. Eight films that illuminate and reveal another narrative of history will be shown for the first time in Spain in their recently restored copies, opening the debate on archiving works, and the role of festivals and film libraries in the reconsideration of the past.